Ohio Window Tint Law (September 2022)

Ohio Window Tint Law: The window tint laws in Ohio were brought into existence in 2004 and since then the state of Ohio has been very strict about its laws compared to other areas. For instance, if an officer happens to catch a driver who has not been loyal to the window tint laws in the state of Ohio, he/she is charged with a misdemeanour moving violation. 

How do the officers in Ohio find violations of the window tint law? The officers use a meter that happens to measure and gauge the level of light transmission. 

In this article, you will get to know about the laws set in Ohio for car window tinting and how reflective and dark the tint can be. Towards the complete end of the article, you will also be introduced to some rules and regulations besides to identify legal tinting laws in the state of Ohio which are equally important.

Check out other States Window Tint Law:-

What Does VLT Mean According To Ohio State Law

VLT(Visible Light Transmission) is basically the percentage of visible light allowed through your car windows by your window film. Each state has its own legal allowable limits to this.

In Ohio, the amount of light allowed to travel through your film and also glass varies for passenger vehicles and multi-purpose vehicles.

HGH VLT= MORE AMOUNTS OF LIGHT TO PASS THROUGH YOUR WINDOW TINT FILMS.

LOW VLT= LESS AMOUNTS OF LIGHT TO PASS THROUGH YOUR WINDOW TINT FILMS.

For instance, a 70% tint will allow only 70% of the light to pass through whereas a 50% tint will allow only 50% of the light to pass through.

Tint percentages for passenger vehicles and multi-purpose vehicles are different. Let us have a look at them.

Ohio Tint Laws: For Passenger Vehicles

  • Front Windshield: Non-reflective tint is allowed on the top 5 inches of the windshield.
  • Front seat side windows: up to 50% tint darkness allowed
  • Back seat side windows: Any tint darkness can be used
  • Rear windows: Any tint darkness can be used

Ohio Tint Laws : For Multi-purpose Vehicles

  • Front Windshield: Non-reflective tint is allowed on the top 5 inches of the windshield.
  • Front seat side windows: up to 50% tint darkness allowed
  • Back seat side windows: Any tint darkness can be used
  • Rear windows: Any tint darkness can be used

Window Tint Reflections In Ohio

Basically, according to the usual Ohio window tint laws, the car window tint film should have metallic elements to reflect incoming light to reject heat and glare generated by visible light.

Tint reflection for passenger vehicles:

  • Front side windows: no reflectorized materials allowed.
  • Back side windows: no reflectorized materials allowed.

Tint reflection for multi-purpose vehicles:

  • Front side windows: no reflectorized materials allowed.
  • Back side windows: no reflectorized materials allowed.

What is the punishment in Ohio for window tints that are too dark?

Like mentioned earlier if an officer stops a driver who does not happen to follow the window tint laws in the state of Ohio then they are charged with a misdemeanour moving violation. The fees cost about $120 overall. Windows that violate the Ohio window turning laws have no medical exemptions.

Other Ohio Tinting Laws Rules And Regulations

  • Do I need to have side mirrors in Ohio? If the view from the windshield mirror is obstructed then side mirrors are required.
  • Is colored tint illegal in Ohio? All tint colors are allowed in Ohio.
  • What are the window tint certification rules in Ohio? You need to make sure that your dealer is using a certified film. Tint film manufacturers have to certify the film they sell.
  • Do I need a certified sticker from the company installing my window tint in Ohio? Between the film and glass on each and every tinted window, there is a sticker that identifies legal tinting as required.
  • Are there medical exemptions in Ohio for window tint? The law of the state of Ohio makes no mention of medical exemptions for special tint.

We hope you understood the Ohio window tinting laws and if not, we always recommend double-checking with your local DMV and law enforcement authorities.

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